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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa. found in the catalog.

Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa.

Wilfrid E. Le Gros Clark

Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa.

by Wilfrid E. Le Gros Clark

  • 131 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Printed by order ofthe Trustees of the British Museum .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Previous ed.1950.

SeriesFossil mammals of Africa series;no.1
ContributionsLeakey, Louis Seymour Bassett.
The Physical Object
Pagination117p.,ill.,32cm
Number of Pages117
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19751215M

This new volume on the Geology of East Africa provides a concise account of the multi-faceted regional geology and stratigraphy of East Africa, that is Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Much of the data presented, however, is highly relevant to the surrounding countries and regions as well. The contrasting landforms of East Africa, mountains on one side, plateaux, low plains, and rift valleys on the.   The fossil record provides little information about the evolution of the human lineage during the Late Miocene, from 10 million to 5 million years ago. Around 10 million years ago, several species of large-bodied hominids that bore some resemblance to modern orangutans lived in Africa .

  The Miocene also saw the appearance and radiation of early apes (> ape species) throughout the open woodlands of Africa-Eurasia. Dryopithecus (Figure 3 Right) was one of the wide-ranging genera that appeared in the second half of the Miocene following the contact of Africa with Eurasia, and its remains have been found from France to Hungary.   From the Late Miocene through the Pliocene, East African herbivore families exhibit differential rates of diet change from C 3-dominated to mixed C 3 /C 4 or C 4-dominated diets. C 4 grasses were available by Ma at Nakali, but of the population sampled (n = ), only a dozen equids, a single rhinocerotid, and two suids and gomphotheriids.

The British anthropologist Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey () made major contributions to the study of prehistoric man. The parents of L. S. B. Leakey were British missionaries who settled at Kabete, Kenya, near Nairobi, in Leakey was born on Aug. 7, , in Kabete, where he formed lifelong friendships with boys of the Kikuyu tribe, with. Leakey, Louis (). "East African Hominoidea and the classification within this super-family". In Washburn, Sherwood Larned (ed.). Classification and Human Evolution. New York: Wenner-Gren. pp. 32– CS1 maint: ref=harv ; Morell, Virginia (). Ancestral Passions: The Leakey Family and the Quest for Humankind's Beginnings. Simon and.


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Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa by Wilfrid E. Le Gros Clark Download PDF EPUB FB2

Stone Age Africa: an Outline of Prehistory in Africa. Illustrated by Mary. White African: an Early Autobiography. The Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa With Wilfrid Le Gros Clark.

Volume I of the series Fossil Mammals of Africa published by the British Museum of Natural Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa. book. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Clark, Wilfrid E. Le Gros (Wilfrid Edward Le Gros), Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa.

London, Printed by order of. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Andrews, Peter, Revision of the Miocene hominoidea of East Africa.

London: British Museum (Natural History), White African: an Early Autobiography: Louis described it as a "pot-boiler" written in for Hodder & Stoughton. The Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa: With Wilfrid Le Gros Clark.

Volume I of the series Fossil Mammals of Africa published by the Natural History Museum in London. Awards: Hubbard Medal (), Prestwich Medal (). 9. Le Gros Clark, W. E., and Leakey, L. B., The Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa, Fossil Mammals of Africa No.

1 (Brit. Mus. Nat. Hist., ). Google ScholarCited by: Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR) Keywords Late Miocene —A revision of the Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa, Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History), Geology series.

85–a. Google Scholar. African Genesis - edited by Sally C. Reynolds March During the s, several new taxa of putative hominids have been described from the Upper Miocene of Africa: Orrorin tugenensis from the Tugen Hills, Kenya ( to Ma), Ardipithecus kadabba from the Middle Awash, Ethiopia ( to Ma) and Sahelanthropus tchadensis from Toros-Menalla, Chad (7 to 6 Ma).

WE report here the discovery of a Miocene hominoid from Berg Aukas, Namibia, the first known from the African continent south of equatorial East Africa. This represents a major range extension of Miocene Hominoidea in Africa to latitude 20° S. The holotype, a right mandibular corpus preserving the crowns of the P 4 -M 3, partial crown and root of the P3, partial root of the canine.

The Miocene ruminant fauna of East Africa shows similarities to the Middle Miocene ruminant fauna of Europe, and undoubtedly includes the fossilized remains of deer. The Miocene deposits of Rusinga and Songhor are probably of similar age, but the fossil faunas which they contain differ, and may represent distinct environments.

Abstract. The phylogenetic relationships and adaptations of Kenyapithecus have been of special interest since Leakey (, p. ) first described the genus as possessing a number of characters exhibiting “a marked tendency in the direction of the Hominidae.” Expectations regarding the hominid affinities of Kenyapithecus influenced the reconstruction of many functionally and.

A revision of the Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History), Geology, 30 (2): 85 – Beauvilain, A. and Watté, J.-P. from book Human Origins and A revision of the Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa, All of the apes from the early Miocene of East Africa seem to represent a single phyletic.

Old World monkeys were restricted to Africa for much of their early evolutionary history, but extended their range into Eurasia during the late Miocene (10–9 Ma) (Jablonski and Frost ). The earliest fossil Old World monkeys, belonging to the family Victoriapithecidae, are from the early and middle Miocene of North and East Africa.

Morotopithecus of East Africa is the earliest Miocene fossil left in Hominoidea based on the derived state of 1 lumbar vertebra. The new view of descent of hominoids may make biogeographic sense, with several extinct Eurasian clades of catarrhines evolving independently of African catarrhines until Africa and Asia connected in the Middle Miocene.

WE report here the discovery of a Miocene hominoid from Berg Aukas, Namibia, the first known from the African continent south of equatorial East Africa.

This represents a major range extension of. References Andrews, P. A revision of the Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa. BuUetin of the British Museum (Natural History), Geological Ser Le Gros Clark, W.

& Leakey, L. The Miocene ttominoidca of East Africa. Fossil Mammals of Africa 1, 1-I London: British Museum (Natural History). Home › Revision of the Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa. Revision of the Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa.

By Andrews, P. SKU# $ Add to Cart. a; 7 full page black-and-white photo-plates, 29 text-figures and maps. Publisher’s original blue wrappers, lettered in black on the front cover, lg 8vo.

Journals & Books; Register Sign in. terrestrial bipedalism because it is the most recently acquired morphological-behavioural complex shared by the African great apes and humans.

We suggest that in the late middle and late Miocene of East Africa, as habitats were becoming more open and desiccated and resources more widely separated. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version.

Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. The small, common apes of the Miocene deposits of East Africa previously assigned to two species of one genus, Limnopithecus, have been shown to differ at the generic level in both dental and postcranial features.

The prior and smaller of the two species (the genotype of Limnopithecus) somewhat resembles in dental morphology African dryopithecines.

Proconsul nyanzae is a species of fossil primate first discovered by Louis Leakey on Rusinga Island inwhich he published in Nature in It is also known by the name Dryopithecus africanus.A joint publication of Wilfrid Le Gros Clark and Louis Leakey in"The Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa", first defines Proconsul Simons and Pilbeam replaced Proconsul with.Early Miocene.

Nearly 20 genera of ‘hominoids’ are currently known from the Miocene of Africa (Fleagle, ); but taxonomy of Hominoidea is controversial (see, e.g. Harrison,for a different perspective).Among Early Miocene hominoids, the anatomy of the postcranium is best known in the 17–20 Ma genus Proconsul, owing to the existence of several partial skeletons as well as many.Books.

A selection: Adam's Ancestors: the evolution of Man and his culture (). Ran to four editions, very popular. White African: an early autobiography () The Miocene Hominoidea of East Africa, with Wilfred Le Gros Clark.

() Olduvai Gorge: a report on the evolution of the hand-axe culture in Beds I–IV ().